Blair 2.0

Discussion in 'Speakers Corner' started by damodici, Apr 10, 2018.

  1. Pete meet Dano, Dano meet Pete, discuss :D
     
  2. Correct me if I am wrong but I read it recently that parliament was not consulted prior to the declaration of war on Germany.
     
  3. Silly me, I thought interviewees were there to answer questions and not to just make the points they wish to make.

    Where is Brillo when you need him ?
     
  4. Media suggested this morning that it was a fairly new convention. Actually 2003 it was first used and since been used as the norm. So I stand corrected, Blair had in his time when I suggested he didn’t.
     
  5. We have said exactly the same thing, so not much to discuss on that point.
     
  6. Parliamentary approval has been sought and obtained prior to military action on plenty of previous occasions, e.g. the 1982 Falklands War. It was in 2003 (in Blair's era) that this became an established constitutional convention. It remains to be seen if the present government wants to, or is able to, abolish that convention.
     
  7. Silly you, of course interviewees are there to make the points they wish to make and not be distracted by questions they are asked.
     
  8. hmm, so i was thinking, Theresa May has issued a long legal justification for UK participation in an attack on a sovereign state. This is so flawed as to be totally worthless. It specifically claims as customary international law practices which are rejected by a large majority of states and therefore cannot be customary international law. It is therefore secondary and of no consequence that the facts and interpretations the argument cites in this particular case are erroneous, but it so happens they are indeed absolutely erroneous.

    Let me put before you the government’s legal case in full:
    1.This is the Government’s position on the legality of UK military action to alleviate the extreme humanitarian suffering of the Syrian people by degrading the Syrian regime’s chemical weapons capability and deterring their further use, following the chemical weapons attack in Douma on 7 April 2018.

    2.The Syrian regime has been killing its own people for seven years. Its use of chemical weapons, which has exacerbated the human suffering, is a serious crime of international concern, as a breach of the customary international law prohibition on the use of chemical weapons, and amounts to a war crime and a crime against humanity.

    3.The UK is permitted under international law, on an exceptional basis, to take measures in order to alleviate overwhelming humanitarian suffering. The legal basis for the use of force is humanitarian intervention, which requires three conditions to be met:
    (i) there is convincing evidence, generally accepted by the international community as a whole, of extreme humanitarian distress on a large scale, requiring immediate and urgent relief;

    (ii) it must be objectively clear that there is no practicable alternative to the use of force if lives are to be saved; and

    (iii) the proposed use of force must be necessary and proportionate to the aim of relief of humanitarian suffering and must be strictly limited in time and in scope to this aim (i.e. the minimum necessary to achieve that end and for no other purpose).

    4.The UK considers that military action met the requirements of humanitarian intervention in the circumstances of the present case:

    (i) The Syrian regime has been using chemical weapons since 2013. The attack in Eastern Damascus on 21 August 2013 left over 800 people dead. The Syrian regime failed to implement its commitment in 2013 to ensure the destruction of its chemical weapons capability. The chemical weapons attack in Khan Sheikhoun in April 2017 killed approximately 80 people and left hundreds more injured. The recent attack in Douma has killed up to 75 people, and injured over 500 people. Over 400,000 people have now died over the course of the conflict in Syria, the vast majority civilians. Over half of the Syrian population has been displaced, with over 13 million people in need of humanitarian assistance. The repeated, lethal use of chemical weapons by the Syrian regime constitutes a war crime and a crime against humanity. On the basis of what we know about the Syrian regime’s pattern of use of chemical weapons to date, it was highly likely that the regime would seek to use chemical weapons again, leading to further suffering and loss of civilian life as well as the continued displacement of the civilian population.
    (ii) Actions by the UK and its international partners to alleviate the humanitarian suffering caused by the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian regime at the UN Security Council have been repeatedly blocked by the regime’s and its allies’ disregard for international norms, including the international law prohibition on the use of chemical weapons. This last week, Russia vetoed yet another resolution in the Security Council, thwarting the establishment of an impartial investigative mechanism. Since 2013, neither diplomatic action, tough sanctions, nor the US strikes against the Shayrat airbase in April 2017 have sufficiently degraded Syrian chemical weapons capability or deterred the Syrian regime from causing extreme humanitarian distress on a large scale through its persistent use of chemical weapons. There was no practicable alternative to the truly exceptional use of force to degrade the Syrian regime’s chemical weapons capability and deter their further use by the Syrian regime in order to alleviate humanitarian suffering.

    (iii) In these circumstances, and as an exceptional measure on grounds of overwhelming humanitarian necessity, military intervention to strike carefully considered, specifically identified targets in order effectively to alleviate humanitarian distress by degrading the Syrian regime’s chemical weapons capability and deterring further chemical weapons attacks was necessary and proportionate and therefore legally justifiable. Such an intervention was directed exclusively to averting a humanitarian catastrophe caused by the Syrian regime’s use of chemical weapons, and the action was the minimum judged necessary for that purpose.

    14 April 2018.
    The first thing to note is that this “legal argument” cites no authority. It does not quote the UN Charter, any Security Council Resolution or any international treaty or agreement of any kind which justifies this action. This is because there is absolutely nothing which can be quoted – all the relevant texts say that an attack on another state is illegal without authorisation of the UN Security Council under Chapter VII of the UN Charter.

    Nor does the government quote any judgement of the International Court of Justice, International Criminal Court or any other international legal authority. This is important because rather than any treatment, the government makes a specific claim its actions are justified by customary international law, which means accepted state practice. But the existence of such state practice is usually proven through existing court judgements, and there are no judgements that endorse the approach taken by the government in its argument.

    The three “tests” set out under para 3 as to what is permitted under international law are not in fact a statement of anything other than the UK’s own position. These “tests” are specifically quoted by Ola Engdahl in Bailliet and Larsen (ed) “Promoting Peace Through International Law” (Oxford University Press 2015). Engdahl notes:

    The UK position, that it is permitted to take coercive action under a doctrine of humanitarian intervention when certain conditions are met, is a minority view and does not reflect lex data on the prohibition of the use of force in international relations as expressed in article 2(4) of the UN Charter.
    That is undeniably true, and as it is equally undeniably true that a minority view cannot be customary international law, the British government position is utterly devoid of merit.

    The Government argument is a classic statement of the doctrine of “liberal intervention”, which is of course the mantra adopted by neo-conservatives over the last 30 years to justify resource grabs. It is not in any way accepted as customary international law. It is a doctrine opposed by a very large number of states, and certainly by the great majority of African, South American and Asian states. (African states have occasionally advocated the idea that UN Security Council authorisation may be replaced by the endorsement of a UN recognised regional authority such as ECOWAS or the African Union. This was the Nigerian position over Liberia 20 years ago. The Security Council authorised ECOWAS action anyway, so no discord arose. The current Nigerian government does not support intervention without security council authorisation)
    The examples of “liberal intervention” most commonly used by its advocates are Sierra Leone and Libya. My book “The Catholic Orangemen of Togo” details my experiences as UK Representative at the Sierra Leone peace talks, and I hope will convince you that the accepted story of that war is a lie. Libya too has been a disaster, and it is not a precedent for the government’s legal argument as the western forces employed were operating under cover of a UN Security Council Resolution authorising force, albeit only to enforce a no fly zone.
    In fact, if the British government were to offer examples of state practice to attempt to prove that the doctrine it outlines is indeed customary international law, the most appropriate recent examples are Russian military intervention in Ukraine and Georgia. I oppose those Russian interventions as I oppose the UK/US/French actions now. It is not a question of “sides” it is a question of the illegality of military action against other states.

    The rest of the government’s argument is entirely hypothetical, because as the liberal intervention doctrine is not customary international law these arguments cannot justify intervention.

    But the evidence that Assad used chemical weapons against Douma is non-existent, and the OPCW did not conclude that the Assad government was responsible for the attack on Khan Sheikhoun. There is no evidence whatsoever that military action was urgently required to avert another such “immediate” attack. Nor is it true that the UK’s analysis of the situation is “generally accepted” by the international community, as witness China and Russia voting together in the Security Council yesterday to condemn the attack.

    So the British government sets up its own “three tests” which have no legal standing and are entirely a British concoction, yet still manages to fail them.
     
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  9. But what do you think, finm?
     
  10. i think its all to much for me to offer anything more than some expert opinion some might be interested in. :)
     
  11. Always happy to help people without original thoughts fin :upyeah:
     
  12. Experts. We've discussed them before, haven't we : o D
     
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  13. International law states ‘he with the biggest fucking bombs makes all the fucking rules’
     
  14. International law is largely aspirational and idealistic. It is woolly and vague in the extreme. How such "laws" could be made, amended, repealed, or enforced is unclear. The notion that the right of a sovereign state to take military action must always be subordinated to the veto of UNSC member countries like Russia and China is patently absurd, and is accepted by virtually nobody. Everything is up for argument.

    More to the point is the question of whether any military action is or is not legal within the legal and political system of the country taking the action. In the case of the UK, the interesting debate is about the power of parliament v. the royal prerogative, not legality. Mr Murray's waffle about international law is inconsequential.
     
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  15. waffle being the key word, if its so easy to ignore international law and agreements, will any future endeavor to create future agreements and or law with a country that flouts them so easily been seen as just that "waffle".
    does your international reputation come into it? does it even matter?
     
    #216 finm, Apr 16, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
  16. He thinks thinking is so important.
    Elementary dressmaking next?
     
  17. yip, i hear breibart have a pull out on it, this week is how to sew yer own swastika
     
    #219 finm, Apr 16, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
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  18. How about having an international reputation for allowing your foreign policy to be vetoed by Vladimir Putin, instead of decided upon by your own government and parliament and agreed with your allies. Would that be better, in your mind?
     
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