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Laminated Suit Reproofing?

Discussion in 'Clothing, Gadgets & Equipment' started by JAT, Feb 15, 2020 at 8:29 AM.

  1. I’m sitting here watching the rain fall from the sky and I have a question.
    I have a Dainese laminated jacket plus trousers, do they need reproofing periodically?
    I bought them second hand and they’ve been superb up to now but I haven’t tried them in torrential rain.
    I’m off to finmland in April and it sometimes rains fairly heavily there so I’m told......
     
  2. JAT I’ve got a Dainese laminated suit as well, had it for about 6 years so I’ve washed it and re proofed it a few times.

    After washing all the crap and dead bugs out, it take it straight out of the washing machine while it’s still damp and lay it on the lawn outside.
    I then give it a good going over with spray on liquid Nikwax, any outdoor shop will sell this, then I give it a decent going over with a new clean paintbrush to work it in and spread it evenly, I give the seams a double coat and work in again with the brush.
    Then pick em up and bung em in the tumble dryer for 20 minutes or so, don’t need to be bone dry, then just let them dry naturally.
    Works for me, after treatment like this you can see the water beading up on them, all good.
     
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  3. Have a look at Motolegends recommendations on cleaning and reproofing kit.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. Brilliant chaps, thanks for the advice.
     
  5. I've used Scrubbers and they were brilliant:upyeah:
     
  6. I can fully understand the benefit and principle behind spraying/brushing a reproofing product (DWR) on the outside of the garment but what I'm confused about (I know, it doesn't take much) is that some reproofing products are designed to be used simultaneously with the washing product/cycle; surely this must result in the inside of a laminated garment being coated with the product - does this not restrict the garment's ability to breath and allow moisture to escape out?
     
    #7 Stanford, Feb 15, 2020 at 8:42 PM
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020 at 8:51 PM
  7. Spent a week in Finland and it rained all week. Full of trees and lakes so yep it rains.
    Save hassle and get an ex British army gortex suit. Happy dry bunny.

    Reuse, recycling save the planet and look cool :upyeah:
     
  8. Yes in a nut-shell (sic). Best results after washing with appropriate cleaning agents is to tumble dry on a low heat, or iron outside of garment. Again on a low heat using a cloth between the iron and item of clothing.
     

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