British Indy: What Happens Now?

Discussion in 'Speakers Corner' started by Loz, May 23, 2015.

?
  1. Full Brexit with "no EU deal" on the 29th March.

  2. Request Extension to article 50 to allow a general election and new negotiations.

  3. Request Extension to article 50 to allow cross party talks and a new deal to be put to EU.

  4. Request Extension to article 50 to allow a second referendum on 1. Remain in EU or 2. Full Brexit.

  5. Table a motion in parliament to Remain in EU WITHOUT a referendum.

  6. I don't know or I don't care anymore

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. The USA political system is almost fractal in the manner it exhibits checks and balances. Not least of which the manner that State Law and Federal Law hold each other in check.

    So yes, a "mini-federal" system in the UK as opposed to the medieval Commons, Lords, Supreme Court, Local Council that we have now offers some attractive features to me.

    And so you should.

    Just a thought:
    Westminster is a shit-show "but what ya gonna do, that's them posh City of London feckers for ya!"

    Compared to:
    "Those feckers down the road are taking the piss. It's about time we walked into Town Hall and gave them some serious shit."

    This is a genuine concern. I'm just not sure it's a show-stopper.

    Mmmm ... yeah, but nah.

    I understand "economy of scale" but equally I also understand "industrial-grade corruption and grift". There will be compensatory factors plus there are swings and roundabouts: the cost vs benefit calculus cannot simply be a matter of numbers.

    The USA is an example of federal power being limited by local power (the State legislatures).
    The Swiss exhibit this kind of system in *spades", where decisions often rest in the hands of the populace. Whilst UK politicians are rock stars and household names, Swiss politicians are famous only when their names appear on the ballot papers - which is damned well as it should be.

    The caveat, the health-check, indeed the sanity-check of everything I offer up is here is always dependent on the quality and calibre of the General Public.
    People who don't care about how they are governed make proper, decent, worthwhile government nearly impossible. People who care about how they are governed are the single most important factor of "good government".

    Or, as I am wont to say on regular occasions, "People get the government they deserve - always and without exception".
     
    #40042 Loz, Oct 9, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  2. Sorry It did pass over my head, didn’t realise she was a lap dancer, but that still has to be proven. Mr Bercow on the other hand is caught bang to rights m’laud
     
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  3. So lost that I quoted verbatim in my previous post the very opt-out that you now saying you would like to introduce to me!
    Please try to keep up.
     
  4. Ex lap dancer from many years past :thinkingface:
     
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  5. finm2.jpg
     
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  6. If true, such shenanigans are not only wholly unacceptable .. they pale into utter insignificance compared to the other examples of malfeasance and corruption that one sees or can intuit from the past twenty years (and more) of UK politics. And that's before we address the current Brexit clusterfuck.

    I'll set my stall out here: if BoJob, a politician I trust no more than another of his ilk, can get the UK genuinely out of the EU, in accordance with the 2016 Ref and the 2017 GE manifestos of the main political parties ... I will hold back any howling for justice over political malfeasance and corruption until he gets the job done.

    And if anyone as a result, wishes to scream of "dual standards and political expediency", I will simply point the complainant in the direction of Chinese oppression, genocide, etc and quote the word, "realpolitik".
    Until you are prepared to go to war with China over the Uighurs, you are compromising your moral principles and being a hypocrite, same as anyone else.
     
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  7. What is the evidence that it is “proven” please?

    I can only find two news links. One is the Express whose article provides scant detail and simply stated a conclusion as a non sequitur. The Torygraph also has the story but it’s behind a paywall and I don’t intend to give them a red cent of my money.
     
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    • EU Parliament president David Sassoli revealed he met John Bercow for talks
    • The MEP said they 'shared an awareness' that a No Deal Brexit would be bad
    It’s all out there
     
  8. non sequitur. English please
     
  9. It is one of the few borrowed words in English which has no English equivalent.
     
  10. #40053 Zhed46, Oct 9, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  11. There’s this thing called “google”. I find it really useful when I come across a new word. iPhones also have a “look up” feature
     
  12. Alliances and acting against one malefactor but refusing to act against another are hypocritical but ‘‘twas ever thus”. Realpolitik is very different indeed to driving a coach and horses through the constitution, trashing the established norms of politics and allowing the Executive free rein, as it sets a very dangerous precedent. As I pointed out a while ago, next time they want to do something naughty, it might be you and yours who end up on the wrong end of it. Checks and balances, as imperfect as ours are compared to the USA, are there for a reason and for everyone
     
    #40055 Zhed46, Oct 9, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
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  13. It's been my experience that many remainers are unaware of what the eu are upto most of the time.
     
  14. Because they clearly didn't know what they were voting for :thinkingface:
     
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  15. finm2.jpg finm .jpg
     
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  16. Twins!!!!!!!!! :scream: